Employment Blog

7 Ways You May Be Sabotaging Job Interviews

You've heard the obvious job interview advice: don't be late, don't dress inappropriately, and don't curse your former employer. You've been around the block—you know this stuff.
What ELSE might be going wrong? Here a few things I've observed in my years of working with clients.

1) Being Cocky
They're good at what they do, they know it, and they communicate that they're somehow above the process. Some others don't prepare because "I'm really good at interviewing." Others underestimate what's coming and just wing it.
2) Not being able to articulate your skills
I've seen a lot of very accomplished people who can't articulate their skills, especially people who haven't had to look for work in a long time. Unless you can clearly articulate how you produce value, your chances of getting hired are close to nil.
3) No good, concise stories
Many people make very impressive accomplishments sound ordinary. Others have stories that go on and on and on—boring! Still others just get tongue tied.
4) Talking techno-speak
If you're in a technical field; remember that some interviews may be conducted by non-technical people--HR for instance. Don't make their eyes glaze over. This is particularly important for those whose jobs involve communicating with non-technical people.
5) Not doing your homework about the company
An even worse turnoff is someone who doesn't know what the organization is about. Find out about the company's mission, strategic goals, and new developments to understand where the company is headed.
6) Not doing your homework about the interviewers
This is a chance for you to score some extra points. If you know in advance who the individual(s) is who will be conducting your interview, read up on him/her.
7) Not having a good answer for the sensitive questions
If you don't handle these questions right, you're dead in the water. The good news is that most of the time, you know what these questions will be in advance—so be prepared!

Follow these steps:
A. Listen to the question
Make sure you understand exactly what the interviewer is asking and why. If you're not clear, ask for clarification.
B. Take time to think
If caught off guard, pause a moment and give a thoughtful response.
C. Use Positive Information
Use positive information to put yourself in a favorable light. Be truthful, but remember, you are marketing yourself. Don't volunteer negative information. For example, Jane is moving across the country to reunite with her high school flame, but she should keep such personal details private.
D. Refocus attention by asking a question of your own
Don't let the conversation linger on your liabilities. Take the initiative to refocus attention by asking the employer a question.
8) Not being prepared to discuss about money
They may screen you out because you were making too much or too little, concluding that you won't be happy with the salary or the job demands exceeds your skill level. This is a big topic for another day. Be sure to read Jack Chapman's book, Negotiating Your Salary: How to Make $1,000 a Minute

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Nationally-recognized career coach Steve Frederick has been helping clients set and reach their career goals for many years. Call today.
Steve Frederick
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Americans with Disabilities (ADA) National Network Disability Law Handbook

August 2013 Newsletter, www.workforce3one.org
An updated version of the ADA National Network Disability Law Handbook is now available for free download on the Disability and Employment Community of Practice. The 110-page handbook, which is a great resource for staff in American Job Centers, is written in a practical “Frequently Asked Questions” format. It provides answers to common questions about the ADA, the ADA Amendments Act, the Rehabilitation Act, Social Security, the Air Carrier Access Act, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, the Civil Rights of Institutionalized Persons Act, and the Fair Housing Act Amendments. It is published by the Southwest ADA Center, on behalf of The National Network of ADA Centers.

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Green Jobs

Green Jobs
http://greenjobs.workforce3one.org/
Thanks to funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, IDES now offers a new online career resource tool - Find Your Green Job. It provides a wealth of information on green industries, both in Illinois and nationwide.

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LinkedIn Summary: A missed opportunity

The LinkedIn summary is a truly different way of talking about and marketing yourself. Unfortunately, many people miss this opportunity. I see a lot of profiles which have no Summary at all.

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Job Interviews: Tell the Truth -- Intelligently

By Steve Frederick, Frederick Career Services

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Afraid You'll Lose Your Job? This can save you time, effort, money, and much more...

This short article could save you a lot of time, effort, money, and something priceless:  samples of your work.  You see, people like Donna are often let go without warning.  She went to work, thinking it was just another day.  Then, she was summoned to the conference room, where a Human Resources manager informed her she was no longer needed.  She was escorted to her desk to retrieve her purse and personal belongings, then out of the building.  This was a major disaster for Donna.

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ONLINE NETWORKING TOOLS

Linkedin.com
"Over 75 million professionals use LinkedIn to exchange information, ideas and opportunities. Stay informed about your contacts and industry. Find the people & knowledge you need to achieve your goals. Control your professional identity online."
• Re-connect - Find past and present colleagues and classmates quickly.

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JOB SEARCH ADVICE

Job Seach Advice from the Experts

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Monster.com Advice on Web Career Frauds

A Safe Job Search

Monster makes protecting job seekers a top priority. We'd like to remind you of what you can do to help keep yourself safe during a job search.>.

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Evanston Public Library has partnered with ILLINOIS WORKNET to offer on-site services.

ADDRESS:
Evanston Public Library
1703 Orrington Avenue, 3rd Floor
Evanston, IL 60201
HOURS:
Monday /Wednesday/Friday 10:00am — 6:00pm
Tuesday /Thursday 10:00am — 8:00pm
Open Lab on Fridays 12:30pm — 6:00pm


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